Home Publications National Nursery Proceedings 1984 Top Pruning and Needle Clipping of Container-Grown Southern Pine Seedlings

Top Pruning and Needle Clipping of Container-Grown Southern Pine Seedlings

Early and severe clipping of longleaf pine (Pinuspalustris Mill.) needles markedly slowed seedling development in containers and resulted in reduced growth in the field. A less severe clipping 3 weeks before outplanting improved seedling survival in a period of severe moisture stress. Some needle clipping of containerized longleaf may be justified to prevent matting of the needles, which can reduce seedling development. Top pruning of loblolly pine (P. taeda L.) and slash pine (P. elliottii Engelm. var.elliottii) seedlings did not affect field survival, but it did reduce height growth after outplanting. Top pruning of containerized slash and loblolly pines should be avoided by controlling height growth with other cultural regimes.


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Author(s): James P. Barnett

Publication: National Nursery Proceedings - 1984

Event: Southern Nursery Conference Proceedings - Eastern Session
1984 - Asheville, NC

Section: Western

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