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Home Publications Tree Planters' Notes Tree Planters' Notes Volume 58, Number 2 (2015) A History of Container Seedling Production in the South

A History of Container Seedling Production in the South

For more than two centuries, tree seedlings (e.g., citrus and shade trees) have been grown in pots (often in greenhouses) in the Southern United States. Not only has the type of container changed over time (from clay pots and wooden boxes to polystyrene or plastic trays) but so has the predominant species grown. Before 1960, researchers used containers in greenhouse trials but few conducted field trials. Promising reports from field trials in Canada, however, stimulated a flurry of outplanting trials in the South in the 1960s. Annual container seedling production in the South reached 1.0 million by 1974 and 3.5 million by 1980; it now exceeds 180 million. Some beliefs about container stock have evolved over time. This article reviews some regional history related to container seedling production of Eucalyptus, hardwoods, and pines. This paper was presented at a joint meeting of the Northeast Forest and Conservation Nursery Association and Southern Forest Nursery Association (Williamsburg, VA, July 21–24, 2014).


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Author(s): David B. South

Publication: Tree Planters' Notes - Volumes 58, Number 2 (2015)

Event: Joint Meeting of the Northeast Forest and Conservation Nursery Association and Southern Forest Nursery Association
2014 - Williamsburg, Virgina

Volume: 58

Number: 2

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