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Home Publications Tree Planters' Notes Tree Planters' Notes Volume 54, Number 2 (2011) A Highly Efficient Machine Planting System for Forestry Research Plantations--The Wright-MSU Method

A Highly Efficient Machine Planting System for Forestry Research Plantations--The Wright-MSU Method

McKenna, J. R., Krauss, O. R., and Beheler, B. Tree Planters' Notes 54(2):32-37. 2011.

For forestry research purposes, grid planting with uniform tree spacing is superior to planting with nonuniform spacing because it controls density across the plantation and facilitates accurate repeat measurements. The ability to cross-check tree positions in a grid-type plantation avoids problems associated with dead or missing trees and increases the efficiency and accuracy of data collection. Such features are particularly beneficial for long-term research plantations. The time and effort required to achieve an accurate grid plantation can be substantial, however, especially in large plantations. This article describes a new, efficient system for machine planting trees on a grid that is useful for a variety of forestry progeny tests—the “Wright-Michigan State University” (W-MSU) method developed by the late Dr. Jonathan Wright and others at Michigan State University. This study compared the W-MSU method with more labor-intensive and common methods of planting trees on a precise grid (direct seeding and planting into augered holes) and found the accuracy of spacing trees was statistically similar among the three methods.


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Author(s): James R. McKenna, Oriana Rueda Krauss, Brian Beheler

Publication: Tree Planters' Notes - Volumes 54, Number 2 (2011)

Volume: 54

Number: 2

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