Home Publications Tree Planters' Notes Tree Planters' Notes Volume 24, Number 3 (1973) Survival and growth of bar-slit planted northern red oak studied in Tennessee

Survival and growth of bar-slit planted northern red oak studied in Tennessee

On forested sites of the Cumberland Plateau, bar-slit planting of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) proved as successful as the slower, center-hole method. Seedlings whose tops and roots were clipped for ease in handling grew as well as ordinary nursery stock. Northern red oak, one of the more desirable Appalachian hardwoods, is seldom abundant in central Tennessee. Natural regeneration is difficult to obtain, even where the seed source is ample. Planting is apparently the only certain way to reproduce this species promptly after harvest cutting or to upgrade depleted stands. Dependable planting techniques will also be needed to replace existing forests with genetically superior stock.


Download this file:

PDF document Download this file — PDF document, 675Kb

Details

Author(s): Thomas E. Russell

Publication: Tree Planters' Notes - Volumes 24, Number 3 (1973)

Volume: 24

Number: 3

Personal tools