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Home Publications Tree Planters' Notes Tree Planters' Notes Volume 23, Number 3 (1972) Jackrabbits injure ponderosa pine seedlings

Jackrabbits injure ponderosa pine seedlings

Jackrabbits, actually hares (Lepus app.), range throughout much of the Western United States (7). Although these animals are most common in grassland or shrub communities, they also frequent open, forested habitats (1,4). Black-tailed jackrabbits (L, californicus) are present in many stands of ponderosa Pine (Pin us ponderosa) in central Oregon, especially where this forest type is interspersed with brush or grassland. In contrast to their sometimes damaging effects on agricultural crop or range lands, forestland jackrabbits appear to have little direct effect on tree crops except during forest regeneration. Then, like their forestdwelling counterpart, the snowshoe hare (L. americanus), they may damage tree seedings (9, 3, 6).


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Author(s): Glenn L. Crouch

Publication: Tree Planters' Notes - Volume 23, Number 3 (1972)

Volume: 23

Number: 3