Home Publications Tree Planters' Notes Tree Planters' Notes Volume 23, Number 3 (1972) Coating Materials Protect Douglas-Fir and Noble Fir Seedlings Against Drying Conditions

Coating Materials Protect Douglas-Fir and Noble Fir Seedlings Against Drying Conditions

Three coating materials tested in Oregon for protection effectiveness on seedlings subjected to desiccating conditions or cold storage show promise for dry weather plantings but are not recommended for seedlings destined for storage. Coating roots with water-holding materials has shown promise for preventing desiccation of conifer nursery stock. A coating might provide more protection from moisture loss than sphagnum moss or other packing now used to cover roots of lifted Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and noble fir (Abies procera Rehd.) seedlings. Three materials -clay slurry; sodium alginate, a seaweed product; and xanthan gum, a hydrophilic colloid of a polysaccharide-were tested in an Oregon study for protection effectiveness on seedlings subjected to cold storage or imposed drying conditions.


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Author(s): Peyton W. Owston, William I. Stein

Publication: Tree Planters' Notes - Volumes 23, Number 3 (1972)

Volume: 23

Number: 3

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