Home Publications Tree Planters' Notes Tree Planters' Notes Volume 18, Number 4 (1967) Herbicide Aids Survival of Douglas-Fir Seedlings Planted on Dry Sites in Oregon; Root Wrapping has Little Effect

Herbicide Aids Survival of Douglas-Fir Seedlings Planted on Dry Sites in Oregon; Root Wrapping has Little Effect

Planting seedlings in containers or wrappers has often resulted in satisfactory survival on sites where planting of bare-rooted stock has been unsuccessful. No "container planting" method, however, is suitable for all sites, and modifications of the original technique may be necessary for different conditions. The aim of the present study was to determine if planting root-wrapped seedlings, as now done on rocky sites in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, would be advantageous for reforesting droughty areas in the Coast range of Oregon. Seedlings are wrapped by placing roots and soil on paper, which is rolled into a tube by a machine constructed on the principle of a cigarette roller. Pitcher (3) described the machine and methods of production. S. Miller (2) advocated planting of t-wrapped seedlings for reforesting the Tillaok burn in Oregon, and the technique was later used experimentally in Indiana (1). The U. S. Forest Service has successfully rehabilitated more than 1,000 acres of extremely stony soils on the Yacolt burn in Washington with root-wrapped seedlings.


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Author(s): Monroe Bickford, Richard K. Hermann

Publication: Tree Planters' Notes - Volumes 18, Number 4 (1967)

Volume: 18

Number: 4

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