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Home Publications Native Plants: Propagating and Planting Vegetation and Erosion: A Literature Survey

Vegetation and Erosion: A Literature Survey

Surface Erosion and mass-soil losses from landslides are of great concern to land managers. Accelerated erosion and slope instability can be caused or exacerbated by human activities. Increased erosion can cause adverse cumulative watershed effects by increasing sedimentation, degrading water supplies, reducing forest productivity, destroying anadromous fish habitat, and degrading other crucial environmental values. Mature, structurally and floristically com-plex, plant communities, significantly reduce surface erosion and contribute greatly to maintaining slope stability. Vegetation management of forested, coastal, urban, agricultural, and riparian areas should conserve and maintain adequate plant cover to be effective. The relative effectiveness of vegetation in any specific locale will be a function of quality of vegetation, topography, slope, hydrology, geology, and soils.


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Author(s): Elliott Menashe

Publication: Native Plants: Propagating and Planting

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