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Home Publications Native Plants: Propagating and Planting Growing Endangered Plants to Save Them: Germinating, Propagating, and Restoring Pink Sandverbena

Growing Endangered Plants to Save Them: Germinating, Propagating, and Restoring Pink Sandverbena

Pink sandverbena is an endangered plant of Pacific Coast beaches. Declining populations and continued threats have lead the Oregon Department of Agriculture to initiate a re-introduction program for the species on the Oregon coast. This pro-gram involves documenting the life-history of the species in natural populations to provide a context for evaluating re-introduced populations. Restoration efforts focus on developing seed germination and field propagation techniques. Germination was highest when seeds were removed from the fruit and placed at alternating temperatures and photo periods, but benefits from cold stratification differ from year to year. Direct seeding and transplanting greenhouse-grown stock both show potential for establishing plants in the field, and can produce offspring in experimental plots on dredged sand.


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Author(s): Thomas N. Kaye, Melissa Kirkland, Nicholas Testa

Publication: Native Plants: Propagating and Planting

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