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Home Publications National Nursery Proceedings 1985 Recent Developments in the Management of Nursery Pests

Recent Developments in the Management of Nursery Pests

Insect pest complexes in the intermountain region continue to change rapidly as new pest species are introduced and different plants become favored in landscapes. Among the more serious of the new pest species to become colonized, has been the honeysuckle witches broom aphid which now threatens the future of tartarian types of honeysuckle throughout most of the country. Developments in insect management, however, continue to keep pace with these changing needs. Use of sex pheromone based insect trapping has expanded so that it is now routinely used to monitor flights and associated egg laying periods for several difficult insect control problems. Insecticide technology has also advanced, with greatest current development among synthetic pyrethroids. Also, broader spectrum Bacillus thuringiensis preparations and soap/detergent sprays are offering less hazardous insect control options that are particularly desirable for high population areas. Finally, expanded use of soil applied systemic insecticides has good promise for control of many insect and mite problems. Advantages of these latter treatments are elimination of drift problems, relative ease of application, and generally thorough plant coverage. Limitations include the need for adequate watering, high toxicity, and the potential for direct effects on plant growth.


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Author(s): Whitney S. Cranshaw

Publication: National Nursery Proceedings - 1985

Event: Intermountain Nurseryman's Association Meeting
1985 - Fort Collins, CO