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Home Publications Nursery Manuals Forest Nursery Manual—Bareroot Chapter 24: Planting-Stock Selection - Meeting Biological Needs and Operational Realities

Chapter 24: Planting-Stock Selection - Meeting Biological Needs and Operational Realities

The tremendous variability in Northwest planting sites requires a variety of planting stock. Genetic, physiological, and morphological seedling characteristics must be matched to site and organizational objectives. Vegetation classification schemes help foresters select species, and seed zones help them determine areas where seedlings of any species can safely be moved from their source. Local species and seed sources should always be preferred unless documented research proves otherwise. Large seedlings, if properly conditioned, will grow faster on favorable sites. Seedlings with tall shoots are better suited to brushy areas and where animal damage may be a problem; large caliper seedlings will perform better where heat, insects, or physical bending are problems. Droughty conditions require seedlings with well-developed roots. Containergrown seedlings can be used to extend the planting season, but spraying soil-active herbicides over them immediately after planting is risky.


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Author(s): R. D. Iverson

Publication: Nursery Manuals - Forest Nursery Manual—Bareroot

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