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Home Publications Forest Landscape Restoration Chapter 15. Challenging a Paradigm: Toward Integrating Indigenous Species into Tropical Plantation Forestry

Chapter 15. Challenging a Paradigm: Toward Integrating Indigenous Species into Tropical Plantation Forestry

In this chapter, the current state of tropical forestry is described, as are global experiences with the use of exotic species and monocultures in plantation establishment, and experiences to date of afforestation and reforestation in tropical countries. The purpose of this chapter is to draw attention to potential afforestation (establishing trees where forests have been absent for an extended period) and reforestation (regeneration of forests after harvesting) strategies that would improve the state of tropical forest management by conserving biological diversity in tropical regions and increasing potential economic bene fi ts to local communities. The global and local bene fi ts from adopting these strategies are economic and environmental; they can be accomplished through the cooperation of researchers and forestry-related practitioners working toward establishment of compositionally diverse, economically viable plantations of native species.


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Author(s): Anthony S. Davis, Douglass F. Jacobs, R. Kasten Dumroese

Publication: Forest Landscape Restoration

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