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Home Publications Forest Nursery Notes 2009 Summer Forest Nursery Notes 2009 Summer Forest Nursery Notes Publication by Article The Latest on Soil Fumigation in Bareroot Forest Nurseries

The Latest on Soil Fumigation in Bareroot Forest Nurseries

Soil fumigation has been used in bareroot forest nurseries to control pathogens, nematodes, insects, and weed seed for many decades (Cordell 1989; Landis and Campbell 1996). Many fungal pathogens are difficult or impossible to control with post-emergent pesticide applications so a majority of nurseries rely on fumigation to keep disease incidence at a minimum. Depending on the fumigant used, some of the target pests include soil fungi (Fusarium, Pythium, Cylindrocarpon, charcoal root rot, Cylindrocladium, Phytophthora), parasitic nematodes, and most weed seeds. At a cost of more than $1000 per acre, soil fumigation can be the most costly cultural practice in a bareroot nursery. This cost is usually justified by the healthy, uniform seedling crop that results from a relatively pest-free field.


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Author(s): Diane L. Haase

Publication: Forest Nursery Notes - 2009 Summer

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