Home Publications Tree Improvement and Genetics Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference 31st Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference (2011) Cold hardiness of Atlantic coastal and Piedmont sources of loblolly pine and their hybrids

Cold hardiness of Atlantic coastal and Piedmont sources of loblolly pine and their hybrids

Planting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) outside the natural range or at higher elevations than it normally occurs negatively impacts its survival, growth rate, and wood quality. Cold acclimation in loblolly pine appears to be more influenced by temperature compared to photoperiod. Also, there is interest in examining if inter-provenance hybridization can combine both fast growth and cold hardiness in commercial populations (Alizoti et al. 2006). Seedling growth differences of first-year of Atlantic Coastal and Piedmont provenances of loblolly pine and their hybrids in an outdoor environment in North Carolina were reported by Kegley et al. (2004). These results were verified at four years, when height and volume were assessed in five Piedmont regions (Alizoti et al. 2006). However, it was not confirmed that the hybrid populations would exhibit acceptable cold hardiness. The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in cold hardiness between one year-old seedlings of Atlantic Coastal sources, Piedmont sources, and their hybrids, after artificial freezing.


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Author(s): Angelia Kegley, Bailian Li, Fikret Isik, Funda Ogut, Jaime Zapata-Valenzuela, Steven E. McKeand, W. Patrick Cumbie

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