Home Publications Tree Improvement and Genetics Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference 29th Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference (2007) Integration of Crown Morphology and Leaf-level Physiology as a Tool for Predicting Differences in Aboveground Productivity Among Elite Families of Loblolly and Slash Pine

Integration of Crown Morphology and Leaf-level Physiology as a Tool for Predicting Differences in Aboveground Productivity Among Elite Families of Loblolly and Slash Pine

Forest production depends on CO2 assimilation, but is rarely solely a function of leaf-level photosynthesis. Crown characteristics may affect tree growth by altering light interception and photosynthesis at canopy level. Strong light gradients are present in forest canopies, which often result in parallel changes in leaf morphology and leaf nitrogen for efficient use of light in photosynthetic CO2 uptake. However, the genetic basis of crown and canopy trait differences among southern pine taxa are not well understood, but critical in predicting productivity differences for managing sustainable forest ecosystems.


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Author(s): Daniel J. Chmura, Mark G. Tjoelker

Publication: Tree Improvement and Genetics - Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference - 2007

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