Home Publications Tree Improvement and Genetics Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference 24th Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference (1997) Genetic and Reciprocal Effects on First-Year Growth and Leaf Area Development of Sycamore Seedlings

Genetic and Reciprocal Effects on First-Year Growth and Leaf Area Development of Sycamore Seedlings

Seedlings from control-pollinated crosses of American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) were studied for genetic and reciprocal effects on seedling growth and leaf area development during the first growing season in a nursery. Reciprocal effects accounted for most of the variation among families in seedling heights during the first month, but these effects then disappeared . After a dry period during the fourth month (August), reciprocal effects were detected for stem volume and for number and leaf area of live leaves per seedling. Genetic effects were responsible for family variation detected in (1) seedling height and diameter during the other portions of the growing season, (2) seedling stem volume at the end of the season, and (3) leaf area development before the August dry period. Genetic differences in seedling size at the end of the first growing season were related to differences in leaf area expansion early in the growing season (r 0.97). The fastest-growing cross (pair of reciprocals) had the largest leaf area per seedling by three months (July) after the seeds were planted, and it maintained the greatest height, diameter, and stem volume throughout the growing season. Keywords: Reciprocal crosses, Common environmental effects, Family variation, Seedling growth, Leaf expansion, Platanus occidentalis L.


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Author(s): Zhenmin Tang, Samuel B. Land, Jr.

Publication: Tree Improvement and Genetics - Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference - 1997

Section: Contributed Presentations: Full Papers

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