Home Publications Tree Improvement and Genetics Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference 24th Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference (1997) Fusiform Rust Resistance of Central American and Mexican Pine Species Compared with Loblolly and Slash Pines

Fusiform Rust Resistance of Central American and Mexican Pine Species Compared with Loblolly and Slash Pines

Seedlings of five Central American and Mexican pine species and loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and slash (Pinus elliottli Engelm. var. elliottii) pines were tested for fusiform rust (Cronartium quercuum f sp. fusiforme) resistance at the USDA Forest Service Resistance Screening Center to determine the potential value of exotic species for improving rust resistance through hybridization with native species in the southeastern U.S.. The average infection of all species was 76%. Pinus teocote Schl. & Cham. was by far the most resistant with an infection rate of only 29% and the next best lot was Pinus greggii Engelm. (Valle Verde provenance) with an infection rate of 70%. Pinus caribaea Morelet var. hondurensis was the most susceptible species with 93% infection. "Resistant" (genetically improved) and "susceptible" slash pine lots showed 71% and 92% infection, respectively, indicating that genetic improvement of native species can result in infection rates as low or lower than that of the more resistant tropical pine species tested.


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Author(s): Clements C. Lambeth, William S. Dvorak, Carol H. Young

Publication: Tree Improvement and Genetics - Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference - 1997

Section: Contributed Presentations: Full Papers

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