Home Native Plant Network Journal Articles Using compost for container production of ornamental hammock species native to Florida

Native Plants Journal - Article

Using compost for container production of ornamental hammock species native to Florida

Abstract:

Four hammock species native to Florida were larger with more flowers 8 wk after transplanting into containers filled with compost or compost-amended media when compared with a Florida peat-based control. Our study indicated that compost can serve as a viable alternative substrate to peat for container production of Florida butterfly sage (Cordia globosa (Jacq.) Kunth [Boraginaceae]), firebush (Hamelia patens Jacq. [Rubiaceae]), scorpions tail (Heliotropium angiospermum (Murray) Britton. [Boraginaceae]), and tropical sage (Salvia coccinea Buc'hoz ex Etl. [Lamiaceae]). Plants transplanted to containers filled with a biosolid:yard waste compost or a formulated compost-based mix (4:5:1, compost:pine bark:sand, v:v:v) grew better than plants transplanted to a commercial peat-based mix, although initial analyses of the medium indicated that compost alone had higher pH; electrical conductivity (EC); N, P, K, Ca, Zn, Cu, Mn, Al, Fe and B contents; and similar air-filled porosity and C contents when compared with to the peat- or compost-based media. Commercial compost also compares favorably with peat in cost and environmental impacts.

Issue & Pages:

Fall 2004 Pages: 186-195

Article Download:

5-2NPJ186-195.pdf (PDF document)

Authors:

  • Sandra B Wilson
  • Laurie K Mecca
  • Peter J Stoffella
  • Donald A Graetz

Keywords:

butterfly sage, Cordia globosa, firebush Hamelia patens, scorpions tail, Heliotropium angiospermum, tropical sage, Salvia coccinea, biosolids, container media

Personal tools